Binocular Astronomy

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Binoculars are suitable for viewing the Moon

Especially if you wish to see the full lunar disc
and want a quick view, with minimal set-up time.
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How much magnification do I need to see the Moon?

  • 15x magnification or more will let you see the whole moon, while you can use 15x magnification or more to get in closer and reveal more details.
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What magnification of binoculars is better for stargazing?

10×50 Binoculars

  • Handholding is still possible, the optic is still portable, and the 10x magnification gets you a bit closer to the star – the 10×50 binocular is also a popular choice for viewing the night sky.

10×50 or 20×50 Binoculars?

  • Pros
    20×50 binoculars provide a higher magnification of 20 times, offering even closer views.
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  • Cons
    Field of View – generally, higher magnification results in a narrower field of view, and you may need a tripod.
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Binocular Sizes

10×50 / 20×50 / 11×70 / 15×70 / 20×100 / 25×100 – which ones?

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I have tried several different types of binoculars for stargazing and almost without fail when I want to look through binoculars for stargazing I would go straight for my 15x70s.

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10x or 15x magnification

It will be about the largest you can handhold without everything dancing around too much in your view.

The weight is manageable allowing you to hold and view objects for some time before your arms start to get too tired. (10x magnification is a lighter than 15x magnification binoculars.)

They are not too big so remain easily portable.

Cost-effective.

A generous field of view, they will give you some gorgeous views of open clusters, the brighter nebulae, the Moon and even the planets.
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50mm or 70mm diameter

The 50mm or 70mm diameter objective lenses will help you see much fainter stars and objects than the naked eye.

Good contrast, the low 10x or med 15x magnification ensures objects remain bright – in 20x binoculars, the same amount of light will be spread over a larger part of your view making the same image dimmer with lower contrast.

No squinting and good eye relief.

A 5mm exit pupil fits nicely into a dark-adapted human pupil providing comfortable viewing, even for spectacle wearers.

10x50s Binoculars provide an upright non-inverted image, so you can hop between stars and constellations with ease.
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A note from Derek

I think I would to say 15x70s spec that makes them the go-to for most astronomers, but 10x50s will perform better for binocular astronomy than the 20x100s, sure you could mount them on a tripod to stabilise things, but for me, that takes away the beauty of using binoculars to view the night sky.
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My person view for the beginners

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Suitable for the beginners
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10x50s
(newcomers / beginners)
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11x70s

(beginners+)
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15x70s

(beginners+ / amateur)
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Not suitable for the beginners
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20x50s
(in a narrower field of view)
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20x100s
(heavy, you may need a tripod)
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25x100s

(too heavy & high costs)
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  • My person view is that you might go-to use a 15 x70 Oregon Observation binoculars are excellent value for money for the first time or occasional user looking for a pair of large objective lens binoculars for both long range terrestrial observation and stargazing.


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Features

  • Large objective, high magnification for long range terrestrial observation and stargazing.
  • Porro prism design with protective rubber armouring.
  • BAK-4 Fully multi-coated optical system (all air/glass surfaces).
  • Fold down rubber eyecups.
  • Wide wheel focusing.
  • Integral tripod adapter socket.
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Guarantee

  • 5 years
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15×70
Oregon Observation binoculars

Supplied Accessories

  • Oregon Observation binoculars are supplied in a soft carry case with rainguard, wide nylon strap and objective lens caps.



Buy now from Opticron (Luton)

Oregon Observation 15×70 Binoculars

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